Co-morbidities

As you know obesity is a serious, chronic disease that can reduce life expectancy, increase disabilities and lead to many other serious illnesses and diseases. These additional illnesses and diseases are called co-morbidities because they have a higher potential to develop due to the primary disease – obesity. Many studies have found a direct correlation between increases in Body Mass Index (BMI) and increases in co-morbid conditions, especially type 2 diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, stroke and arthritis. In the Lewin study for example, a person with a BMI of 35 or more has a 6.16 times more chance of developing type 2 diabetes than a BMI of 25 or less.

Here are a few common co-morbidities associated with obesity:

High Cholesterol

American Heart Association

Mayo Clinic

Arthritis

Arthritis Foundation

National Center for Biotechnology Information

Mayo Clinic

Sleep Apnea

American Sleep Apnea Association

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute – What is Sleep Apnea?

Heart Disease, Hypertension and Stroke

American Heart Association
The American Heart Association is a national voluntary health agency whose mission is to reduce disability and death from cardiovascular diseases and stroke.

Diabetes

According to the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) more than 30 studies say that weight loss surgery can cure type 2 diabetes. A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that 73 percent of people with diabetes who underwent gastric banding combined with lifestyle modifications including diet and increased physical activity, lowered their BMI, achieved normal blood sugar levels and had no need for diabetes medication. The people in the nonsurgical group lost just 1.7 percent of their body weight, compared with almost 21 percent among those who underwent gastric banding.

A study in JAMA from 2004 of more than 22,000 people who underwent bariatric surgery showed that type 2 diabetes was completely resolved in 76.8 percent of people, and it improved in 86 percent of people.

American Diabetes Association
The American Diabetes Association is the nation’s leading nonprofit health organization providing diabetes research, information and advocacy. The mission of the organization is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.

Weight-control Information Network (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders at the NIH
The Weight-control Information Network (WIN) is a national information service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH). WIN was established in 1994 to provide health professionals and consumers with science-based information on obesity, weight control, and nutrition.